Many-lined Sun Skink

PHOTO CREDIT: LESLEY CHNG

TThis smooth, shiny reptile is one of Singapore’s native species. 

  • Habitat

They can be found on floors of forested areas, mangroves, grasslands and even urbanised areas such as town parks. 

  • Natural Diet

They are carnivorous, and mainly feed on invertebrates such as insects, spiders, and even smaller lizards.

  • Territoriality

Skinks in general are territorial animals, and will guard their nests by standing in front of them 

  • Sociality

Most skinks live in solitary for most of the year until mating season, where they find a mate during mating season.

  • Activity Pattern

This animal is mostly terrestrial and diurnal, as they only come out when there is sufficient sunlight and heat. This is because their internal body temperature varies over a wide range, and they need the heat to raise their internal body temperature and stimulate their metabolism

  • Where can you find it in Singapore?

They can be found in protected areas such as Bukit Timah Nature Reserve, Sungei Buloh Wetland Reserve, and Central Catchment Nature Reserve. In the mornings they can be spotted along hiking trails on rocks, logs or on the ground basking in the sun.

PHOTO CREDIT: DANIEL NG (2009)
Hope this post helped you appreciate this beautiful animal! ❤

SOURCES:

http://www.wildsingapore.com/wildfacts/vertebrates/reptilia/multifasciata.htm
https://wiki.nus.edu.sg/display/TAX/Eutropis+multifasciata+-+Many-lined+Sun+Skink
https://www.ecologyasia.com/verts/lizards/many-lined_sun_skink.htm
https://animals.mom.me/lizards-lie-sun-morning-4286.htmlhttps://www.softschools.com/facts/animals/skink_facts/280/

One thought on “Many-lined Sun Skink

  1. Nice write-up about a common yet frequently overlooked species 🙂 Also good that you explained how it relies on external heat to raise its internal body temperature – animals that do this are described as ‘ectothermic’.

    Like

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